UltraRAM: Universal memory becomes clearer



This is one of the challenges of tomorrow's computing: creating a non-volatile RAM, capable of both storing data over the long term but also being ultra-fast for software and application launches and file creation. This is one of the challenges of tomorrow's computing: creating a non-volatile RAM, capable of both storing data over the long term but also being ultra-fast for software and application launches and file creation. Researchers at Lancaster University may have found the magic formula with UltraRAM.Researchers at Lancaster University may have found the magic formula with UltraRAM.


Computers use two types of memory: RAM, or RAM, which represents working memory; and hard drive and Flash storage memory. The first is very fast, but also very volatile, and requires constant refreshment so as not to be lost. The second keeps the data when it is not powered, but is much slower. In July 2019, a group of researchers from Lancaster University in England announced that they had succeeded in creating a universal memory, combining the benefits of the two.


These same researchers have just published a new article on IEEE.org detailing their progress in this area. This memory uses the quantum properties of a triple-barrier structure with resonant tunnel effect, which allows to create non-volatile RAM, or NVRAM. Thanks to an ambient temperature simulation, they were able to measure the speed of operation as well as the necessary voltages. Non-volatility is achieved through InAs/AlSb bandwidth shifts, providing a wide energy barrier (2.1 eV) to prevent electron leakage and thus retain data.


A very fast memory and very low consumption

NVRAM also works quickly for RAM, with a 10 nanosecond cycle, similar to the DRAM cycle usually used. In addition to being non-volatile, reading does not destroy data, eliminating the need to refresh content. The memory works with a much lower voltage than Flash memory, and could result in much lower consumption modules than what currently exists.

The simulations showed that this memory should be able to be organized into large dies, in order to produce chips that could replace current technologies, whether in computers and smartphones. The researchers have dubbed their discovery ULTRARAM, and the next step will be to find a Doctoral student to develop their work, especially for the scaling up of their innovation and the possibility of creating dies for engravings on Silicon. Only then can we envisage an imminent integration into our everyday objects.

Post a Comment

0 Comments